The Master of Arts in History helps you develop skills to advance your career.

As a student in the program you will learn how to think critically about historical topics and narratives, to analyze primary source material from the past, to conceptualize and organize independent research projects, and to write clearly and persuasively.

Graduates of the program use these skills in the classroom as teachers and professors; at historical sites as park rangers and museum educators; and in historical societies, publishing houses, and many other areas.

The program has three parts. Students must complete 30 credits of coursework, a comprehensive examination, and a thesis. There are a few required classes, but for the most part students are free to take courses that interest them and are related to their professional ambitions.

As a student in the program you will learn how to think critically about historical topics and narratives, to analyze primary source material from the past, to conceptualize and organize independent research projects, and to write clearly and persuasively.

Graduates of the program use these skills in the classroom as teachers and professors; at historical sites as park rangers and museum educators; and in historical societies, publishing houses, and many other areas.

The program has three parts. Students must complete 30 credits of coursework, a comprehensive examination, and a thesis. There are a few required classes, but for the most part students are free to take courses that interest them and are related to their professional ambitions.

Our exceptional faculty members offer specialized courses in areas related to their research interests. They also mentor students one-on-one during thesis research and writing, sharing their professional expertise and helping students hone their abilities.

Christopher Brooks’ current research deals with John S. Rock, the first African-American attorney admitted to argue before the US Supreme Court and has worked with the Institute for Justice and National Constitution Center on the topic.

Dr. Brooks teaches the courses African Americans and the Courts, History of American Ideas, US Constitutional History and Law, Europe in Crisis 1914-1939, and Nationalism and Democracy in 19th Century Europe.

Christopher Dudley studies early eighteenth century Britain, especially changes in politics, religion, and the economy following the Revolution of 1688, with a focus on emerging aspects of modernity. His current research explores voter behavior in Parliamentary elections between 1710 and 1742.

Dr. Dudley teaches the courses Britain in the Age of Discovery and Revolution, The British Empire, Early Modern Europe, and The French Revolution and Napoleon.

Shannon Frystak is an award-winning writer and historian who specializes in the Modern Civil Rights Movement with an emphasis on female activism. Her most current research is a biography of Lucille Watson, owner and manager of Cross Keys Plantation in Tensas Parish, Louisiana.

Dr. Frystak teaches the courses African American History, The American Civil Rights Movement, American Women’s History, Labor History and Industrial Relations, Post-1940 United States, and The Sixties.

Michael Gray is working on a third book dealing with Civil War prisons. He also serves as series editor of Voices of the Civil War with University of Tennessee Press, where he has overseen the release of 9 publications to this date.

Dr. Gray teaches the courses Civil War and Reconstruction, Interpreting Civil War Sites, Jacksonian Democracy, US Military History, and Western Expansion.

Erin O’Donnell’s research focuses on the history of Indian (specifically, Bengali) and Bangladeshi visual culture, as expressed through film and photography. She is particularly interested in the artistic expression and construction of trauma in Bengali and Bangladeshi films addressing the 1947 Partition of India and 1971 Bangladeshi War of Independence. Her book on one of the most significant avant-garde Indian filmmakers, Ritwik Kumar Ghatak (1925-1976), who wrote, produced, directed and/or acted in plays, feature films and documentaries in Bengal during the socially and politically tumultuous period from the late 1940s through the mid-1970s will be published in 2021 by Bloomsbury Press.

Dr. O’Donnell teaches the courses China in Revolution, Colonialism and Nationalism in South Asia, Vietnam and Southeast Asia, and History through Film.

Contact Us

For more information about the program please contact the Graduate Coordinator, Professor Shannon Frystak (sfrystak@esu.edu).

Contact Information

Campus Address
Stroud 409
Phone:
(570) 422-3286
Title of Department Leader
Graduate Coordinator
Name
Shannon Frystak
Phone:
(570) 422-3262