Self-isolation after the onset of symptoms remains one of the most critical steps a symptomatic individual can take toward recovery and limiting the spread of mumps. The university continues to recommend this measure for symptomatic students, faculty and staff.

It is important for community members to be aware of the symptoms and take steps to keep you and others healthy.

What You Can Do

Overall management for mumps is similar to that of chicken pox. There is no treatment, only relief of symptoms. Take Motrin or Tylenol for fever and swelling, drink plenty of fluids and get plenty of rest. One of the most important steps you can take if you experience symptoms is to self-isolate, avoid travel and limit contact with others for five days from the onset of symptoms. For healthy people, there is very little risk of serious complications from the mumps. 

If you have had close contact with someone symptomatic for the mumps, and have never received the Measles, Mumps, and Rubella (MMR) vaccine, the recommendation is to receive the full two-dose MMR series.

If you have had close contact with someone symptomatic for the mumps, and have previously received the MMR vaccine, the recommendation is to receive a third booster dose of the vaccine. The third booster dose is not recommended unless you have had close contact with a symptomatic person. 

If you are immunocompromised or pregnant, please contact your doctor immediately.

For those who wish to receive the MMR vaccine, it is available at:

  • Your Primary Care Physician

  • Rite Aid - $88.00 (128 Courtland Street, East Stroudsburg)

  • Walmart - $87.88 (355 Lincoln Avenue, East Stroudsburg)

ESU will continue to monitor the campus for suspected cases of the mumps. If the need for a vaccination clinic should arise, the university will make necessary arrangements and contact students with the details.

Prices quoted above are out of pocket costs and may vary based on your insurance coverage and outlet used.  We suggest that you bring any medical insurance information with you in case the cost of the vaccination/booster are covered.

The following precautions against mumps and flu are advised:

  • Cover your mouth with a tissue when coughing or sneezing; use your upper sleeve to cover your cough, not your hand.
  • Wash hands frequently and efficiently. When unable to wash with soap and water, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  • Avoid sharing food and drinks or participating in other activities that may result in saliva exposure.
  • Stay home from school or work when you are sick to rest and limit the spread of illness to others.

Overall management for mumps is similar to that of chicken pox. There is no treatment, only relief of symptoms. Take Motrin or Tylenol for fever and swelling, drink plenty of fluids and get plenty of rest. One of the most important steps you can take if you experience symptoms is to self-isolate, avoid travel and limit contact with others for five days from the onset of symptoms. For healthy people, there is very little risk of serious complications from the mumps. 

If you have had close contact with someone symptomatic for the mumps, and have never received the Measles, Mumps, and Rubella (MMR) vaccine, the recommendation is to receive the full two-dose MMR series.

If you have had close contact with someone symptomatic for the mumps, and have previously received the MMR vaccine, the recommendation is to receive a third booster dose of the vaccine. The third booster dose is not recommended unless you have had close contact with a symptomatic person. 

If you are immunocompromised or pregnant, please contact your doctor immediately.

For those who wish to receive the MMR vaccine, it is available at:

  • Your Primary Care Physician

  • Rite Aid - $88.00 (128 Courtland Street, East Stroudsburg)

  • Walmart - $87.88 (355 Lincoln Avenue, East Stroudsburg)

ESU will continue to monitor the campus for suspected cases of the mumps. If the need for a vaccination clinic should arise, the university will make necessary arrangements and contact students with the details.

Prices quoted above are out of pocket costs and may vary based on your insurance coverage and outlet used.  We suggest that you bring any medical insurance information with you in case the cost of the vaccination/booster are covered.

The following precautions against mumps and flu are advised:

  • Cover your mouth with a tissue when coughing or sneezing; use your upper sleeve to cover your cough, not your hand.
  • Wash hands frequently and efficiently. When unable to wash with soap and water, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  • Avoid sharing food and drinks or participating in other activities that may result in saliva exposure.
  • Stay home from school or work when you are sick to rest and limit the spread of illness to others.

Frequently Asked Questions

The following FAQs is a compilation of information available on the CDC website and from local Health & Wellness providers: 

  • What are mumps?

    Mumps is a highly infectious disease passed through saliva and respiratory secretions.  While the incubation period is 12 to 25 days, symptoms often appear 16 to 18 days after exposure. 

  • Is mumps a serious disease?

    Mumps can be serious, but most people with mumps recover completely within two weeks. While infected with mumps, many people feel tired and achy, have a fever, and swollen salivary glands along the jaw and neck. Others may feel extremely ill and be unable to eat because of jaw pain, and a few will develop serious complications. Men and adolescent boys can develop pain or swelling in their testicles. Women and adolescent girls can develop pain or swelling in their ovaries. Inflammation of the protective membranes covering the brain and spinal cord (meningitis) and loss of hearing can also occur, and in rare cases, this hearing loss can be permanent. The most serious complication is inflammation of the brain (encephalitis), which can lead to death or permanent disability.

  • What should I do during a mumps outbreak?

    Be sure that you are update to date on your MMR vaccine. You may also want to consider a booster. Those at an increased risk of contracting mumps are those who live in close contact with others, share sport equipment or drinks, kissing, or living in close quarters, with a person who has mumps.

    In any situation, including when there is a mumps outbreak, washing hands often with soap and water and having good health practices are the most important steps you can take to avoid getting sick and spreading germs to others.

  • I’ve got the mumps vaccine but still got mumps.  Does this mean the vaccine doesn’t work?

    The MMR vaccine prevents most but not all cases of mumps and complications caused by the disease.  People who have received two doses of the MMR vaccine are about nine times less likely to get mumps than unvaccinated people who have the same exposure to mumps virus. However, some people who receive two doses of MMR can still get mumps, especially if they have prolonged, close contact with someone who has the disease. If a vaccinated person does get mumps, they will likely have less severe illness than an unvaccinated person.

  • Can I get the vaccination or booster locally?  Where?  How?
    • Your Primary Care Physician
    • Rite Aid - $88.00 (128 Courtland Street, East Stroudsburg)
    • Walmart - $87.88 (355 Lincoln Avenue, East Stroudsburg)

    ESU will continue to monitor the campus for suspected cases of the mumps. If the need for a vaccination clinic should arise, the university will make necessary arrangements and contact students with the details.

    Prices quoted above are out of pocket costs and may vary based on your insurance coverage and outlet used.  We suggest that you bring any medical insurance information with you in case the cost of the vaccination/booster are covered.

  • What are the symptoms of mumps?

    Symptoms of mumps appear 16-18 days after exposure to the infection.  Symptoms for mumps are similar to influenza (the flu) and often include tender swollen glands below the ear and along the jawline on one or both sides of the face and neck, headache, fever and cold-like symptoms.  People with mumps are considered infectious from 2 days before swelling begins through 5 days after the start of swelling. 

    If you feel you may have been exposed to mumps, symptoms include:

  • How are mumps transmitted?

    The virus is transmitted through droplets, e.g. sneezing, coughing, sharing drinking containers/food/utensils, kissing, and other close contact.

  • What should I do to prevent mumps from spreading?

    In addition to staying away from those who are suspected or confirmed to have mumps, you can:

    • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze and immediately discard the tissue in the trash.  If a tissue is not available cough or sneeze into the upper sleeve or elbow, not your hands.
    • Wash your hands regularly with soap and water.
    • Avoid sharing items that might have saliva on them (e.g. water bottles, glasses, utensils, etc.)
    • Disinfect frequently-touched surfaces such as doorknobs, desks, other surfaces.
  • What should I do if I think I have been exposed to mumps?

    Students who are concerned they are showing symptoms should go to Lehigh Valley Hospital-Pocono’s Student Health Services during regular hours of operation or the ExpressCARE facility located at 200 E. Brown Street. The combined Health Service hours and ExpressCare hours are 8 a.m. – 8 p.m. daily. Students needing medical attention after 8 p.m. may visit the LVH-P emergency room.

    Any ESU community member who has not been vaccinated should seek the guidance of their medical practitioner immediately.

  • If I have mumps, what do I do?

    Overall management for mumps is similar to that of chicken pox.  There is no treatment, only relief of symptoms.  Take Motrin or Tylenol for fever and swelling, drink plenty of fluids and get plenty of rest.  One of the most important steps you can take if you experience symptoms is to self-isolate, avoid travel and limit contact with others for 5 days from the onset of symptoms.  For healthy people, there is very little risk of serious complications from the mumps.

    If you have not had the Measles, Mumps or Rubella (MMR) vaccine and have had close contact with a symptomatic person the recommendation is to receive the two-dose series of the vaccine.  If you have received the vaccine, the recommendation is for you is to receive a third dose.  If you are immunocompromised or pregnant, please contact your doctor immediately.

  • If I have mumps, what should I do and who should I contact at ESU?

    If think you have the mumps, or are experiencing symptoms contact student health services at Lehigh Valley Hospital-Pocono (272) 762-4378.

    If you have questions regarding health and wellness procedures being implemented on campus please contact health and wellness at (570) 422-3804.

Contact Us

If think you have the mumps, or are experiencing symptoms contact student health services at Lehigh Valley Hospital-Pocono (272) 762-4378.

If you have questions regarding health and wellness procedures being implemented on campus please contact ESU Student Health Services at (570) 422-3804.

Contact Information

Campus Address
Sycamore Suites, Lower Level
Phone:
(570) 422-3553
Fax:
(570) 422-3731 (Fax)
Title of Department Leader
Acting Director of Health and Wellness
Name
Laura Suites
Phone:
(570) 422-3298