Black Lives Matter is a social movement that began 7 years ago in response to the acquittal of the murderer of Trayvon Martin.

#blacklivesmatter asks us to acknowledge that our culture does not make Black individuals feel as though they and their experiences are important--that they are in fact vital to the fabric of our country and its values.

#blacklivesmatter asks us to acknowledge that our culture does not make Black individuals feel as though they and their experiences are important--that they are in fact vital to the fabric of our country and its values.

Black Lives Matter is also an ethos--it asks us to consider why Black individuals feel the way that they do. How have we each contributed to a society that still judges individuals by the color of their skin? That treats them differently? Bars them from employment? Emotionally, spiritually, and physically harms them? Renders them powerless? That centers the White experience as the "norm?" Kills them?

We know that these are really difficult conversations to have; however, learning, growing, and changing always are. While we acknowledge this difficulty, these conversations are necessary for a civil and just society. Colleges and universities are places where we are supposed to be engaging in this work--the work of exploring new and possibly uncomfortable ideas. To question. To reaffirm. To proclaim. We want ESU to be a place where students, faculty, and staff are exposed to many points of view and help to develop the skills to critically think and engage in meaningful discourse.

In order to do this, each of us has a responsibility to begin with ourselves. Here is a list of resources to get you started:

Black Lives Matter is also an ethos--it asks us to consider why Black individuals feel the way that they do. How have we each contributed to a society that still judges individuals by the color of their skin? That treats them differently? Bars them from employment? Emotionally, spiritually, and physically harms them? Renders them powerless? That centers the White experience as the "norm?" Kills them?

We know that these are really difficult conversations to have; however, learning, growing, and changing always are. While we acknowledge this difficulty, these conversations are necessary for a civil and just society. Colleges and universities are places where we are supposed to be engaging in this work--the work of exploring new and possibly uncomfortable ideas. To question. To reaffirm. To proclaim. We want ESU to be a place where students, faculty, and staff are exposed to many points of view and help to develop the skills to critically think and engage in meaningful discourse.

In order to do this, each of us has a responsibility to begin with ourselves. Here is a list of resources to get you started:

Books

Podcasts

Films and Television

Donate To

Web Resources

Contact Us

For more information or to get involved with the Committee, please email Cornelia Sewell-Allen.

Contact Information

Campus Address
Reibman Administration Building
Phone:
(570) 422-3463
Fax:
(570) 422-3410 (Fax)
Title of Department Leader
Assistant Vice President, Campus Life & Inclusive Excellence
Name
Cornelia V. Sewell-Allen
Phone:
(570) 422-4017