Howard (Sandy) Whidden

Associate Professor of Biology

Teaching

 

Courses Taught

BIOL 114  Introductory Biology I:  The first of two introductory courses for Biology majors.   Covers general principles of biology, with an emphasis on structures and processes at or below the level of the cell.


BIOL 115  Introductory Biology II:  The second of two introductory courses for Biology majors.   Covers general principles of biology, with an emphasis on the classification, structure, and function of plants, animals, and other organisms.


BIOL 200  General Ecology Lab:  A lab that accompanies lectures for the General Ecology course.   Provides numerous opportunities for students to get out of the classroom and into the field; many of our field sites are in nearby Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area.


BIOL 462 / 562  Mammalogy:  An upper-level undergraduate / graduate course on the biology of mammals.   Topics include the biology of mammals, worldwide diversity of mammals, and identification and natural history of Pennsylvania mammals.   Field experience with mammals and use of the literature of mammalogy are integral parts of the course.   A research project is required when taking this course for graduate credit.


BIOL 463 / 563  Conservation Biology:  An upper-level undergraduate / graduate course on conservation biology.   Explores the current biodiversity crisis, including the ethical and legal foundations underlying the discipline of conservation biology, factors that have led to the current biodiversity crisis, and approaches used by conservation biologists to maintain and restore biodiversity.

My teaching interests lie in various aspects of organismal and evolutionary biology.   I like teaching introductory courses because I enjoy introducing students to the wonders of the living world.   I also find it satisfying to go into greater depth on topics related to my research interests by teaching advanced courses in Mammalogy and Conservation Biology.   In the labs for several courses, I take students out into the field, where they can experience and learn about the natural world first hand.

ESU students holding a 3-banded armadillo on a Mammalogy class field trip to the Bronx Zoo.

ESU students setting Sherman traps on a Mammalogy class field trip to ESU’s Stony Acres recreation center.