Howard (Sandy) Whidden

Associate Professor of Biology

Research

 

Recent Research Funding

Assessment of Bat Activity in Luzerne County, PA, after White-nose Syndrome.  2010.  National Speleological Society - Rapid Response Fund.  $6904.

Assessment of Bat Activity in the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area Following the Appearance of White-nose Syndrome.  2010.  National Park Service.  $2500.

Assessment of Bat Activity in the Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River Corridor Following the Appearance of White-nose Syndrome.  2010.  National Park Service.  $2500.

Post-construction Wildlife Monitoring at Bear Creek Wind Farm, Luzerne County, PA.  2006.  Pennsylvania Department of Natural Resources, Harrisburg, PA.  $20,000.

Targeted Mammal Inventory for the Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River.  2005.  National Park Service Inventorying and Monitoring Program, Harrisburg, PA.  $39,000.

Examination of Bat Mortality at Penobscot Mountain Wind Farm, Luzerne County, PA.  2005.  Pennsylvania Game Commission / State Wildlife Grant.  $155,200.

Matching funds for: Examination of Bat Mortality at Penobscot Mountain Wind Farm, Luzerne County, Pennsylvania.  2005.  Bat Conservation International.  $10,000.

Indiana Bat Survey at Penobscot Mountain, Luzerne County, PA.  2005.  Energy Unlimited.  $10,000.

Appalachian Trail Mammal Inventory for Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, and Connecticut.  2004.  National Park Service Inventorying and Monitoring Program, Woodstock, VT.  $62,262.

Survey for Northern Flying Squirrels (Glaucomys sabrinus) in Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area.  2003.  National Park Service, Milford, PA.  $2368.

Recent Publications

Whidden, H.P.  2010.  Eastern Small-footed Myotis, Myotis leibii.   Pp. 335-337 in:  M.A. Steele, M.C. Brittingham, T.J. Maret, and J.F. Merritt, eds.  Terrestrial Vertebrates of Pennsylvania, A Complete Guide to Species of Conservation Concern.  Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.


Whidden, H.P.  2010.  Northern Myotis, Myotis septentrionalis.  Pp. 358-360 in:  M.A. Steele, M.C. Brittingham, T.J. Maret, and J.F. Merritt, eds.  Terrestrial Vertebrates of Pennsylvania, A Complete Guide to Species of Conservation Concern.  Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.


Sedivec, S.A., and H.P. Whidden.  2007.  Appalachian Trail Mammal Inventory for Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York and Connecticut: 460 trail miles. National Park Service Technical Report NPS/NRTR 2007/097.

Sedivec, S.A., and H.P. Whidden.  2007.  Importance of trap type for the detection and conservation of small mammals. Park Science, 24: 67-71.

Liu, F.-G. R., P.E. Moler, H.P. Whidden, and M.M. Miyamoto. 2004.  Allozyme variation in the salamander genus Pseudobranchus: Phylogenetic and taxonomic significance.  Copeia 2004(1): 136-144.

Whidden, H.P.  2002.  Extrinsic snout musculature in Afrotheria and Lipotyphla.  Journal of Mammalian Evolution, 9: 161-183.

Whidden, H.P., A.W. Ray, and J.B. Bowles.  2002.  Identification and distribution of masked and Hayden's shrews (genus Sorex) in Iowa.  Journal of the Iowa Academy of Science, 109:19-24.

Whidden, H.P., and R.J. Asher.  2001.  The origin of the Greater Antillean insectivorans.  Pp. 237 - 252 in:  Biogeography of the West Indies: Patterns and Perspectives (Charles A. Woods and Florence E. Sergile, eds.).  CRC Press, Boca Raton, 608 pp.

Whidden, H.P.  2000.  Comparative myology of moles and the phylogeny of the Talpidae (Mammalia, Lipotyphla).  American Museum Novitates, 3294: 1-53.

I have broad interests in the biology of mammals, including their natural history, conservation, morphology, and systematics.   My current research largely concerns the natural history and conservation of Pennsylvania mammals, especially small mammals and bats.  My students and I have been working with the Pennsylvania Game Commission and the National Park Service to help assess the impact of wind turbines and White-nose Syndrome on Pennsylvania’s bat populations. However, I retain a strong interest in the morphology and systematics of mammals, particularly moles and shrews and their relatives.